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Is grey acceptable?

I was always astonished knowing and reading about people's changing subjectivities when they move places , especially calling it 'torn between cultures' and I used to challenge the changing subjectivities in conditions as such. However, now I find myself in the very same situation. In societies, where prejudice is called value and wage wars to preserve them...there are no middle grounds. Its either good or bad, and only the power guised as masses , decided what comes as good and what is bad? The good that needs to be preserved and the bad that needs to be demolished and silenced.

I increasingly find myself nowhere amidst the chaos. I challenge what needs to be preserved and I give voice to what is considered to be silenced. Although I am not in opposition to any of the impositions, I dont find myself leaning towards any of the fronts and that is where the grey shines. But would grey be acceptable...is the question that remains silent?



Comments

  1. Grey is possible. Grey is good. Everything is not black and white. Hear your own voice. Weigh the pros and cons of black and white. It will all become clear. I promise. If you allow it to. Have patience and faith.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Dear Wazhma Frogh,

    I listened to the LSE Podcast and could imagine you would be interested in the http://GiveYourVote.org project. I could not find your email so I just decided to post a comment.

    The idea of the project is that british citizens are giving away their votes to people in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Ghana - might sound strange, but you will find detailed information on their website.

    It is friends of mine who are organizing the whole thing and it would be great if you would support the project.

    All the best for you,

    Fred

    ReplyDelete
  3. what i liked well now am loving about you is that what is silenced by everyone the bad side is re-opened by you Wazhma hats off to you and grey is always Good:*

    ReplyDelete

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