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The gate keepers of religion are making people dance to their tunes....

You would agree that these days, we are all struggling with the flux of information and news coming our ways. The greed for more is watered by the savvy cyber mania's like facebook, twitter and etc. I woke up this morning to a spark of enraged tweets on the ban of facebook and youtube in Pakistan due to the High Court's decision of banning these websites because of 'objectionable content' that offend Muslims faith and beliefs. I always remember that as a kid, my father used to tell us " If someone tells you that the cat snatched your nose, do not run after the cat, instead check if your nose is in its place". Of course, none of us could understood what he meant. But today the more I see people antagonizing violently against anyone who questions or according to them 'mocks' their religious beliefs, they all start running after the cat, rather than strengthening their beliefs and actually believing in those beliefs.

Because believing in those religious believes would also require the believers to manifest the internalization and adaptation of those values in their attitude and actions. While hundreds of men protested violently against the drawings of the Prophet (PBUH) in Karachi, the two police officers were defending their bail in Wah Cant, around Peshawar for the crime of raping a 13 year old girl called Natasha as e-tribute reported today. I thought I wish we had some more hundreds to stand up for justice for this little girl who was raped daily for almost 21 days, forced to drink alcohol and dance naked. How are we able to sleep everyday in calm when such cruelties are inflicted on our children and we call ourselves believers, I wondered. Doesnt our religious beliefs and faith require us to revolt against injustices and cruelty? But maybe, protesting for justice for children wouldnt be politically sensational nor the media would be interested in covering it. After all, its only the controversies that make the headlines.

Although many of us are aware that it is the predatory acts of politicians to sustain their monopoly over people's faith and beliefs and it is them that trigger anger and provoke violent reprisals of Muslims in Pakistan and many other muslim and non muslim countries. But the matter to worry is the bouts of violence that can easily penetrate into people's daily lives and vast swaths of people especially the youth indulge themselves emotionally in the political games of those politicians. And that is where the role for critical involvement of every individual comes in. We need to break the vicious cycle of violence and the monopoly of these religious gate keepers and should not allow anyone to (mis) represent us.


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